Spangler (Anthony) School in Milpitas Unified School District

The best afterschools that pick up your child from Spangler (Anthony) School.

 

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Spangler (Anthony) School

Address: 140 N Abbott Ave, Milpitas, CA 95035
District: Milpitas Unified School District
Phone: (408) 635-2870
Highest grade: Sixth grade
Lowest grade: Kindergarten
Superintendent: Cheryl Jordan
Principal: Mr. Luis Lopez

Regular Day
TK: 8:45 to 1:35
Kindergarten: 8:45 to 2:05
Grades 1-6: 8:45 to 2:45

Minimum Day
TK: 8:45 to 12:05
Kindergarten: 8:45 to 12:15
Grades 1-6: 8:45 to 12:55

School Description and Mission Statement 
We work collaboratively to ensure HIGH LEVELS of LEARNING for All Spangler Students! We work collaboratively to ensure HIGH LEVELS of LEARNING for All Spangler Students!

 

Theory of Action
Spangler’s Theory of Action: If we implement high quality Professional Learning Communities (PLC’s) within a Response to Intervention and Instruction (RTI2) model, then all students will learn at high levels.
Realizing that the demands on our educational system have never been greater and the consequences of failure as severe, I knew that we had to invest in first redefining Spangler’s culture if we were to realize our Theory of Action. We set out to rebuild our school culture around the 4 PLC questions: 1. What is it we want all students to learn? 2. How will we know when each student has acquired the intended knowledge and skills? 3. How do we respond when students don’t learn? and 4. How will we respond to students who have mastered the intended knowledge and skills? All these questions address the fundamental purpose of schooling, learning.

Our PLC’s will identify struggling students by using an effective Response to Intervention and Instruction model. Once we identify, through progress monitoring, which students have/haven’t mastered specific learning targets, we do something about it – we do not wait for our students to fail. Thus, RTI and PLC’s are “natural partners”.

At Spangler, our focus is on learning. Our theory of action is focused on results and student learning is our fundamental purpose. Our PLC’s work in collaborative teams focused on results to develop a shared sense of the school they hope to become, and they articulate the collective commitments they are prepared to make to move our school forward. Specific and measurable goals serve as targets and timelines. Our PLC’s engage in collective inquiry: setting goals, teaching, giving common assessments and checking for progress along the way. PLC’s identify strengths and weaknesses in student learning and use the information to drive continuous improvement and inform instruction.

 

Over time, it became clear that our main challenge was PLC question 3: “how do we respond when our students don’t learn?”. We examined the basic assumption of schooling – that all kids can learn and then explored what that meant for Spangler’s staff. We realized that in one classroom, beliefs and responses might greatly differ from those of the room next door. This meant that Spangler students who experience difficulty in learning are subject to very different responses based on the beliefs and practices of their individual teachers.

In being truly committed to the concept of learning for each student we realized that we must stop subjecting our students to a haphazard, random, educational program when they struggle academically. Instead, we set out to develop a set of consistent, systematic procedures (Universal Screening Planning Guide/Referral) that ensures each student is guaranteed additional time and support when needed.

Once our staff begins to respond to our students communally (Tier 2) rather than as individuals, our school will be one step closer to becoming a high functioning Professional Learning Community within an RTI model. Our challenge remains at the Tier 2 level, collectively responding to the needs of our students.

 

When students struggle, the remedy shouldn’t solely be left up to the judgment and individual beliefs of one teacher. No teacher can possibly possess all the knowledge, skills, time, and resources needed to ensure high levels of learning for all his/her students. Instead, our teachers continue to work in collaborative teams to systematically answer the question, “What do WE do when our students don’t learn?”, thereby ensuring a systematic, school-wide approach.
Providing additional time and support relies more on determination and will than on additional resources. We understand, though, that no system of intervention will ever compensate for poor teaching. For this reason, in addition to developing an intervention system, it is necessary to develop the capacity of every educator to become more effective. Tier 1, the Core Program, must be strengthened through collective responsibility and job embedded collaborative professional learning communities focused on best practice.
Currently Spangler has approximately 14% struggling readers, students two years or more below benchmark. Our focus is on all Tiers, most especially Tier 1, our Core Program. Our core program is intended to meet the educational needs of at least 75% of our students. We are falling short of that 75% proficiency rate, so before we prescribe Tier 2 or Tier 3 interventions, classroom teachers must differentiate instruction for small groups of students within the classroom
The primary purpose of RTI is to deliver research based interventions and to use students’ response to those interventions as a basis for determining instructional needs and intensity. In Spangler’s RTI model, interventions are provided early – by regular and special education teachers, reading specialists, and qualified paraprofessionals. We are harnessing the resources and expertise of specialists in general education, Title I, ELL, and special education.
Our Response to Intervention model is a work in progress. Each year I will pose the same question, “What do we do when our students don’t learn?” Engaging staff in the process of exploring and resolving this question creates ownership in and commitment to both PLC’s and RTI.
Anthony Spangler School serves approximately 610 transitional kindergarten through sixth grade students. Ours is a rich, balanced microcosm of the world community. A variety of languages are spoken in our homes. Almost fifty percent of all households speak a language other than English. Approximately 50% of our students qualify for the Federal Free and Reduced Lunch Program.
At Spangler, we strive to create a stimulating and challenging learning environment that provides for varied approaches to learning, success for all students, and high expectations for academic achievement. Therefore, students will be powerful thinkers, effective communicators, self-directed learners, and responsible citizens.
The Spangler Staff is comprised of 26 teachers, a Resource Specialist, a Science Specialist, 2 secretaries, 2 custodians, 10 paraprofessionals/instructional assistants, 2 part time P.E. paraprofessionals, a psychologist, a counselor, and 2 Speech and Language Therapists.
Our district and school goal is to Close the Achievement Gap While Improving Academic Achievement For All Students. This provides us with a focus to use differentiated instructional strategies to meet the needs of our diverse student population as measured by student performance on district and state assessments. In addition, Spangler School has a philosophy of early intervention, following the state-endorsed Response to Instruction and Intervention (RtI2) framework. Examples of this are teachers providing small group daily support for students not at grade level that is further bolstered by school-wide intensive intervention programs before, during and after school. Teachers work in professional learning communities to address the unique needs of each and every student. The Cycle of Inquiry-setting goals, monitoring progress and adjusting instruction is the focal point of our work together.

 

Source: SARC, see the California Department of Education (CDE) SARC webpage at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/.

Student Enrollment Trend by Grade Level

Enrollment Trend by Grade Level
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
K 108 112 125
1st 89 80 92
2nd 70 87 79
3rd 69 70 85
4th 91 78 66
5th 78 88 78
6th 70 72 91
Total 575 587 616

Student Enrollment by Student Group (School Year 2017—18)

Student Group Percent of Total Enrollment
Black or African American 2.4 %
American Indian or Alaska Native 0.6 %
Asian 43.5 %
Filipino 21.4 %
Hispanic or Latino 20.8 %
Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander 0.5 %
White 6.7 %
Two or More Races 4.1 %
Other 0.0 %
Student Group (Other) Percent of Total Enrollment
Socioeconomically Disadvantaged 33.0 %
English Learners 26.5 %
Students with Disabilities 11.7 %
Foster Youth 0.2 %

 

Source: SARC, see the California Department of Education (CDE) SARC webpage at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/.

The SARC provides the following information relevant to the State priority: Pupil Achievement (Priority 4):

    • Statewide assessments (i.e., California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress [CAASPP] System, which includes the Smarter Balanced Summative Assessments for students in the general education population and the California Alternate Assessments [CAAs] for English language arts/literacy [ELA] and mathematics given in grades three through eight and grade eleven. Only eligible students may participate in the administration of the CAAs. CAAs items are aligned with alternate achievement standards, which are linked with the Common Core State Standards [CCSS] for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities); and
  • The percentage of students who have successfully completed courses that satisfy the requirements for entrance to the University of California and the California State University, or career technical education sequences or programs of study.

CAASPP Test Results in ELA and Mathematics for All Students
Grades Three through Eight and Grade Eleven
Percentage of Students Meeting or Exceeding the State Standard

Subject School
2016—17
School
2017—18
District
2016—17
District
2017—18
State
2016—17
State
2017—18
English Language Arts / Literacy (grades 3-8 and 11) 63.0% 70.0% 68.0% 71.0% 48.0% 50.0%
Mathematics (grades 3-8 and 11) 56.0% 63.0% 62.0% 65.0% 37.0% 38.0%

Note: Percentages are not calculated when the number of students tested is ten or less, either because the number of students in this category is too small for statistical accuracy or to protect student privacy.

Note: ELA and Mathematics test results include the Smarter Balanced Summative Assessment and the CAA. The “Percent Met or Exceeded” is calculated by taking the total number of students who met or exceeded the standard on the Smarter Balanced Summative Assessment plus the total number of students who met the standard (i.e., achieved Level 3-Alternate) on the CAAs divided by the total number of students who participated in both assessments.

Last updated: 1/9/2019

CAASPP Test Results in ELA by Student Group
Grades Three through Eight and Grade Eleven (School Year 2017—18)

CAASPP Assessment Results – English Language Arts (ELA)

Disaggregated by Student Groups, Grades Three Through Eight and Grade Eleven

Student Group Total Enrollment Number Tested Percent Tested Percent Met or Exceeded
All Students 320 314 98.13% 70.06%
Male 160 157 98.13% 66.88%
Female 160 157 98.13% 73.25%
Black or African American
American Indian or Alaska Native
Asian 132 131 99.24% 84.73%
Filipino 85 84 98.82% 65.48%
Hispanic or Latino 66 63 95.45% 52.38%
Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander
White 15 15 100.00% 73.33%
Two or More Races
Socioeconomically Disadvantaged 134 129 96.27% 53.49%
English Learners 159 153 96.23% 68.63%
Students with Disabilities 37 33 89.19% 27.27%
Students Receiving Migrant Education Services
Foster Youth

Note: ELA test results include the Smarter Balanced Summative Assessment and the CAA. The “Percent Met or Exceeded” is calculated by taking the total number of students who met or exceeded the standard on the Smarter Balanced Summative Assessment plus the total number of students who met the standard (i.e., achieved Level 3–Alternate) on the CAAs divided by the total number of students who participated in both assessments.

Note: Double dashes (–) appear in the table when the number of students is ten or less, either because the number of students in this category is too small for statistical accuracy or to protect student privacy.

Note: The number of students tested includes all students who participated in the test whether they received a score or not; however, the number of students tested is not the number that was used to calculate the achievement level percentages. The achievement level percentages are calculated using only students who received scores.

 

Source: SARC, see the California Department of Education (CDE) SARC webpage at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/.

California Physical Fitness Test Results (School Year 2017—18)

Grade Level Percentage of Students Meeting Four of Six Fitness Standards Percentage of Students Meeting Five of Six Fitness Standards Percentage of Students Meeting Six of Six Fitness Standards
5 19.8% 18.5% 14.8%

Note: Percentages are not calculated when the number of students tested is ten or less, either because the number of students in this category is too small for statistical accuracy or to protect student privacy.

 

Source: SARC, see the California Department of Education (CDE) SARC webpage at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/.

Average Class Size and Class Size Distribution (Elementary) School Year (2017—18)

Grade Level Average Class Size Number of Classes *
1-20
Number of Classes *
21-32
Number of Classes *
33+
K 18.0 4 4
1 19.0 1 3
2 22.0 3
3 23.0 4
4 33.0 2
5 31.0 2
6 32.0 2 1
Other** 11.0 1

* Number of classes indicates how many classes fall into each size category (a range of total students per class).
** “Other” category is for multi-grade level classes.

 

Source: SARC, see the California Department of Education (CDE) SARC webpage at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/.

Academic Counselors and Other Support Staff (School Year 2017—18)

Title Number of FTE* Assigned to School Average Number of Students per Academic Counselor
Academic Counselor
Counselor (Social/Behavioral or Career Development) N/A
Library Media Teacher (Librarian) N/A
Library Media Services Staff (Paraprofessional) N/A
Psychologist 0.8 N/A
Social Worker N/A
Nurse 0.5 N/A
Speech/Language/Hearing Specialist 1.0 N/A
Resource Specialist (non-teaching) N/A
Other N/A

Note: Cells with N/A values do not require data.

*One Full Time Equivalent (FTE) equals one staff member working full time; one FTE could also represent two staff members who each work 50 percent of full time.

 

Source: SARC, see the California Department of Education (CDE) SARC webpage at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/.

The SARC provides the following information relevant to the State priority: School Climate (Priority 6):

  • Pupil suspension rates;
  • Pupil expulsion rates; and
  • Other local measures on the sense of safety

Suspensions and Expulsions

School School School District District District State State State
Rate 2015—16 2016—17 2017—18 2015—16 2016—17 2017—18 2015—16 2016—17 2017—18
Suspensions 0.2% 1.8% 1.8% 1.7% 2.1% 3.7% 3.7% 3.5%
Expulsions 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% 0.1% 0.1%

 

Source: SARC, see the California Department of Education (CDE) SARC webpage at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/.

The School Site Safety Plan is reviewed, updated, and discussed with the school staff in August of each year. The Milpitas District believes in a comprehensive safety program designed to ensure the health and security of all students and staff. It consists of a wide variety of site drills designed to meet a number of emergency situations that might arise. All school sites regularly practice fire, drop and cover (earthquake), and intruder drills. There are established committees at all sites and levels to review safety procedures, correct any problems that may exist and expand the District’s capacity to deliver services when and where needed.

The District conducts safety inspections at all schools and other district owned properties on a regular basis. In addition, the district safety officer conducts quarterly safety meetings with site safety officers. Qualified personnel conduct or coordinate training’s in CPR, First-Aid, and triage, and the Safety Officer monitors all site safety drills. All school sites have designated staff members that are trained in Advanced First Aid and equipped with safety kits to care for students and staff in the case of an emergency.

The District and the Milpitas Police, Fire, and Office of Emergency Services work cooperatively on a continuous basis in the coordination of city and district personnel and services in the area of school safety. Through the coordinated efforts of the District and City Agencies, a joint City/School disaster drill is held at one of the districts nine elementary and two middle schools on an annual basis.

In addition, the District is an active member in the City’s Emergency Preparedness Commission. The District has revised its Standardized Emergency Management System (SEMS) procedures. A trained district crisis assistance response team has been established to provide site support and district coordination in the event of an emergency.

 

Source: SARC, see the California Department of Education (CDE) SARC webpage at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/.

Opportunities for Parental Involvement (School Year 2018—19)

The staff at Spangler Elementary goes to great lengths to communicate and share our school goals with Spangler families and the community. Our families play an integral part in the Spangler learning community: by attending Parent University, by volunteering in the classroom to support our SEAL implementation or on campus, coordinating activities or special events, coming to “Principal Coffees,” participating on the Spangler PTA, serving on the Spangler School Site Council, or by participating as members of site and district-wide advisory committees.

Our School Site Council is the custodian of our school’s Single Plan for Student Achievement; however, there is quite a bit of overlap between our leadership team, administration and key stakeholders (PTA etc.).

Stakeholder Groups Involved: (Please Refer to the Spangler Family Handbook for meeting dates & times):

– Spangler Staff
– Instructional Leadership Team
– School Site Council (SSC)
– Parent / Principal Coffee Attendees
– Parent Teacher Association (PTA)
– Safety Team (Staff / Parent Attendees)

Stakeholder Feedback/Input provided monthly and/or after parent engagement events via surveys:

– Instructional Leadership Team Meetings
– Staff Meetings
– SSC Meetings
– Parent/Principal Coffee
– PTA Meetings
– Parent Engagement Events

These activities provide parents with a forum for questions, clarification, and feedback concerning classroom and school issues. Spangler hosts the following events throughout the school year to support parent involvement: Parent Universities. Literacy Night, Back to School Night, Latino Nights, and Open House and numerous chorus and dance performances.

Spangler’s Parent/Teacher Association (PTA) is an organization devoted to supporting our student’s academic achievement and making our school a better place in which to learn. Spangler continues to improve as a result of their efforts. Our PTA provides a considerable amount of volunteer time and financial support. They sponsor annual fundraisers that assist with field trips, support for classrooms, and funding materials and supplies for arts programming and our new learning center. Field trips are a part of Spangler’s educational programs, and parents and guardians are strongly encouraged to participate in these meaningful learning opportunities. All fundraising proceeds support Spangler’s commitment to technology, classroom resources, and field trips. All parents are encouraged to become actively involved in PTA activities.

Parents can also be involved in a number of advisory committees. The English Language Advisory Committee (ELAC) is an elected group of parents of English Language Learners or District English Learner Advisory Committee (DELAC). Parents can also become members of the Community Board Advisory Council (CBAC). These groups meet regularly to develop, implement, and evaluate these programs.

A monthly school-wide newsletter (which includes SEAL parent engagement) is on our school web page and provides parents with tips on how to support their children at home in reading, science, math, geography, health, homework, and offering praise. Additionally, various modes of school to home communication, (email, telephone calls, and handwritten notes, Parent-Link messages, regularly sent newsletters) uphold our deeply held belief that parents are our partners in education and our students’ first teachers.

 

Source: SARC, see the California Department of Education (CDE) SARC webpage at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/.

The SARC provides the following information relevant to the State priority: Basic (Priority 1):

  • Degree to which teachers are appropriately assigned and fully credentialed in the subject area and for the pupils they are teaching;
  • Pupils have access to standards-aligned instructional materials; and
  • School facilities are maintained in good repair

 

Source: SARC, see the California Department of Education (CDE) SARC webpage at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/.

Teacher Credentials

Teachers School
2016—17
School
2017—18
School
2018—19
District
2018—19
With Full Credential 25 28 25 502
Without Full Credential 1 0 0 9
Teachers Teaching Outside Subject Area of Competence (with full credential) 0 0 0 1

 

Teacher Misassignments and Vacant Teacher Positions

Indicator 2016—17 2017—18 2018—19
Misassignments of Teachers of English Learners 0 0 0
Total Teacher Misassignments* 0 0 0
Vacant Teacher Positions 0 0 0

Note: “Misassignments” refers to the number of positions filled by teachers who lack legal authorization to teach that grade level, subject area, student group, etc.
* Total Teacher Misassignments includes the number of Misassignments of Teachers of English Learners.

 

Source: SARC, see the California Department of Education (CDE) SARC webpage at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/.

Quality, Currency, Availability of Textbooks and Instructional Materials (School Year 2018—19)

Year and month in which the data were collected: January 2019

Subject Textbooks and Instructional Materials/year of Adoption From Most Recent Adoption? Percent Students Lacking Own Assigned Copy
Reading/Language Arts Grade Title of Textbook Publisher ISBN
K No Textbook N/A N/A
1 California Reading: Student Anthology, Here We Go, Level 1.1 Houghton Mifflin 0-618-15158-3
1 California Reading: Student Anthology, Let’s Be Friends 1.2 Houghton Mifflin 0-618-15160-5
1 California Reading: Student Anthology, Surprises, Level 1.3 Houghton Mifflin 0-618-15713-1
1 California Reading: Student Anthology, Treasures, Level 1.4 Houghton Mifflin 0-618-15714-X
1 California Reading: Student Anthology, Wonders, Level 1.5 Houghton Mifflin 0-618-15715-8
2 California Reading: Student Anthology, Adventures, Level 2.1 Houghton Mifflin 0-618-15716-6
2 California Reading: Student Anthology, Delights, Level 2.2 Houghton Mifflin 0-618-15717-4
3 California Reading: Student Anthology, Rewards, Level 3.1 Houghton Mifflin 0-618-15718-2
3 California Reading: Student Anthology, Horizons, Level 3.2 Houghton Mifflin 0-618-15719-0
4 California Reading: Student Anthology, Traditions, Level 4 Houghton Mifflin 0-618-15720-4
5 California Reading: Student Anthology, Expeditions, Level 5 Houghton Mifflin 0-618-15721-2
6 California Reading: Student Anthology, Triumphs, Level 6 Houghton Mifflin 0-618-15722-0Benchmark Advance Elementary ELA Grades K-6 Adopted 2017-2018
Yes 0.0 %
Mathematics Grade Title of Textbook Publisher ISBN
K Math in Focus® Student Book Set (4 Volumes) ©2012 Marshall Cavendish 978-0-547-646800-0
K Math in Focus® Student Book A, Part 1 ©2012 Marshall Cavendish 978-0-547-62526-3
K Math in Focus® Student Book A, Part 2 ©2012 Marshall Cavendish 978-0-547-62528-7
K Math in Focus® Student Book B, Part 1 ©2012 Marshall Cavendish 978-0-547-62524-9
K Math in Focus® Student Book B, Part 2 ©2012 Marshall Cavendish 978-0-547-62535-5
1 Math in Focus®: Singapore Math Student Book 1A © 2015 Marshall Cavendish 978-0-544-19355-0
1 Math in Focus ® : Singapore MathStudent Book 1B © 2015 Marshall Cavendish 978-0-544-19356-72 Math in Focus®: Singapore Math Student Book 2A © 2015 Marshall Cavendish 978-0-544-19357-4
2 Math in Focus®: Singapore Math Student Book 2B © 2015 Marshall Cavendish 978-0-544-19358-1
3 Math in Focus®: Singapore Math Student Book 3A © 2015 Marshall Cavendish 978-0-544-19359-8
3 Math in Focus®: Singapore Math Student Book 3B © 2015 Marshall Cavendish 978-0-544-19360-4
4 Math in Focus® : Singapore Math Student Book 4A © 2015 Marshall Cavendish 978-0-544-19361-1
4 Math in Focus®: Singapore Math Student Book 4B © 2015 Marshall Cavendish 978-0-544-19362-8
5 Math in Focus® : Singapore Math Student Book 5A © 2015 Marshall Cavendish 978-0-544-19363-5
5 Math in Focus® : Singapore Math Student Book 5B © 2015 Marshall Cavendish 978-0-544-19364-2
6 Math in Focus®: Singapore Math Course 1 Student Book A © 2013 Marshall Cavendish 978-0-547-55936-0
6 Math in Focus® : Singapore Math Course 1 Student Book B © 2013 Marshall Cavendish 978-0-547-56012-0
Yes 0.0 %
Science Grade Title of Textbook Publisher ISBN
K No Textbook N/A N/A
1 California Science Student Edition Pearson Scott Foresman 0-328-18837-9
2 California Science Student Edition Pearson Scott Foresman 0-328-18838-7
3 California Science Student Edition Pearson Scott Foresman 0-328-18839-5
4 California Science Student Edition Pearson Scott Foresman 0-328-18840-9
5 California Science Student Edition Pearson Scott Foresman 0-328-18841-7
6 Focus on Earth Science California Student Edition Pearson Scott Foresman 0-328-24653-0
6 Supplement to Health Health and Wellness Macmillan/McGraw Hill 002-2806059
Yes 0.0 %
History-Social Science Grade Title of Textbook Publisher ISBN
K No Textbook N/A N/A
1 Reflections California Student Edition: A Child’s View Harcourt School Publishers 015-338498-0
2 Reflections California Student Edition: People We Know Harcourt School Publishers 015-338499-9
3 Reflections California Student Edition: Our Communities Harcourt School Publishers 015-338501-4
4 Reflections California Student Edition: California: A Changing State Harcourt School Publishers 015-338502-2
5 Reflections California Student Edition: The United States: Making a New Nation Harcourt School Publishers 015-338503-0
6 Reflections California Student Edition: Ancient Civilizations Harcourt School Publishers 015-338504-9
Yes 0.0 %
Foreign Language N/A 0.0 %
Health N/A 0.0 %
Visual and Performing Arts N/A 0.0 %
Science Lab Eqpmt (Grades 9-12) N/A N/A 0.0 %

Note: Cells with N/A values do not require data.

 

Source: SARC, see the California Department of Education (CDE) SARC webpage at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/.

The Spangler School community understands that school is a place to learn and school holds high standards and expectations for student achievement and behavior. We create an environment that promotes students’ self-esteem, their understanding of themselves and others, and encourages responsible and self- directed behavior. Staff members are dedicated and work to maximize the time students are engaged in academically productive activities.

Spangler began the 2013-14 school year with many physical changes to our school. These included getting new playground structures for the kindergarten and regular playground. We also had our classrooms modernized with new carpeting and HVAC systems. Teachers had to pack up their classrooms, so we took this opportunity to reorganize the school with the younger students on the kindergarten playground side of the school and the older students using the portables on the south side of campus. Spangler Elementary also got a large new Learning Center where technology is housed to facilitate our blending learning programming. Two portable classrooms were connected together to create a “Little Learning Center” where students who need additional support receive “Intensive Intervention” as part of the school’s implementation of our Response to Instruction and Intervention (RTI2) plan. The final details of our Learning Center were completed in December of 2013.

Beginning in 2012 the school library was upgraded and organized through the help of thousands of hours of volunteer time. Existing books were color-coded by Lexile level so that students could easily check out books at their right level. New books were purchased and integrated into the collection. Special areas were created to highlight popular reading series to motivate students to read.

A major project in the school has been organizing instructional materials and resources so that they are accessible and easy to retrieve by staff members rather than having one type of material spread out throughout the school.

This has included collecting math manipulatives from different locations in the school and organizing them into transparent containers located in our new Learning Center. Likewise, other resources have been similarly organized (literature sets for intermediate students, ELD materials and kits, science supplies, Guided Reading materials, informational text collections on science and social studies topics, teacher resource library, and textbooks. District maintenance staff ensures that the repairs necessary to keep the school in good repair and working order are completed in a timely manner. A work order process is used to ensure efficient service and that emergency repairs are given the highest priority.

Per Education Code Section 17592.72 (c), Spangler Elementary School has been evaluated and there are no emergency facilities needs.

School Facility Good Repair Status

Year and month of the most recent FIT report: December 2018

System Inspected Rating Repair Needed and Action Taken or Planned
Systems: Gas Leaks, Mechanical/HVAC, Sewer Good HVAC ducting on roof above teachers workroom need to be replaced. Priority Fiscal Year 19/20
Interior: Interior Surfaces Good
Cleanliness: Overall Cleanliness, Pest/Vermin Infestation Good
Electrical: Electrical Good
Restrooms/Fountains: Restrooms, Sinks/Fountains Poor Galvanized pipe in main bldg. for water supply needs to be replaced. Priority Fiscal Year 19/20. Several restrooms need upgrade.Priority Fiscal Year 21/22
Safety: Fire Safety, Hazardous Materials Good
Structural: Structural Damage, Roofs Fair All portable roofs need reseal/recoat. Priority Fiscal Year 20/21
External: Playground/School Grounds, Windows/Doors/Gates/Fences Fair Several concrete/asphalt areas need to be replaced (front of school by parking lot drive through) Priority Fiscal Year 20/21

Overall Facility Rate

Year and month of the most recent FIT report: December 2018

Overall Rating Good

 

Source: SARC, see the California Department of Education (CDE) SARC webpage at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/.